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1961 AERMACCHI 250 ALA D'ORO

1961 AERMACCHI 250 ALA D'ORO

1961 AERMACCHI 250 ALA D'ORO

Very rare AERMACCHI ALA D'ORO factory race bike as delivered by the factory.

It was ridden and owned by Eric Cheers for many years and was later displayed in the Italian Motorcycle Museum after a total engine rebuilt in 2006.

Eric Cheers was a famous AERMACCHI racer and collector and also raced at the TT and severall GP races 

 

 

Friday, December 17, 2021/Author: admin/Number of views (656)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 3.3
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HONDA RC30 RACER

HONDA RC30 RACER

HONDA RC30 RACER

For sale a WELLBROCK RC30 race bike.

NOW IN ORIGINAL HONDA PAINTWORK

Built and raced by Wolfgang Harbusch of the very famous WELLBROCK team following and using HRC specs and parts 

Its in very very good condition and perfect in every detail.

It also has German road registration papers.

BREMBO brakes

HRC exhaust

HRC magnesium oil sump,

WILBERS suspension,

PVM wheels

Electric waterpump

IGNITECH programmable ignition with HRC settings etc etcetc etc

 

Thursday, May 20, 2021/Author: admin/Number of views (1425)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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PARILLA 175 MSDS PRIVATEER RACER

PARILLA 175 MSDS PRIVATEER RACER

PARILLA 175 MSDS PRIVATEER RACER

1957 PARILLA 175

Frame no.: *450219*
Engine no.: *406660*

 

Engine: Single cylinder DOHC 4-stroke
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 59.8 x 62 mm
Compression ratio: 7.0:1
Engine Capacity: 175cc
Maximum power: 10 bhp [HP] / 6,500 rpm
Valve: DOHC
Valves per cylinder: 2
Carburettor: Dell O’rto
Cooling system: Air cooled
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disc in oil bath
Gearbox: 4 Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Open cradle tubular and pressed steel
Front Suspension: Telescopic fork and shock absorbers
Rear Suspension: Swingarm with hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum
Rear Brake: Drum
Seat: Duck tail race seat
Fuel tank capacity: ca. 14 liters
Weight: 100kg (220lb)
Top speed: 160 km/h (100 mph)

 

Giovanni Parrilla was a Spaniard who grew up in Italy. He was one of many new motorcycle manufacturers who sprung up after World War II. Part of his technical education came when he bought a Norton Manx and took it apart. The company's approach to styling was distinctive and they have joined other Italian small displacement bikes as favourites of the collector crowd.

Giovanni Parrilla built his first motorcycle in 1946, dropping his surname's second 'r' to call the machine 'Parilla'. Mr. Parrilla owned a shop on the outskirts of Milan specialising in the repair of diesel injector pumps. He also held an agency for Bosch sparking plugs.

The first Parilla motorcycle - a 250cc overhead-camshaft single-cylinder racer - was the work of Ing. Giuseppe Salmaggi, who already had the Gilera Saturno to his credit. Giovanni Parrilla was a big Norton fan so the 250 racer's engine employed a bevel-driven overhead-camshaft just like the British manufacturer's Manx. There the similarity ended however, for the Parilla was a thoroughly modern design boasting unitary construction of the engine/transmission and geared primary drive. The new power unit went into a welded loop-type chassis featuring a single down-tube, girder front fork and plunger rear suspension. (Later versions had a telescopic fork and swinging-arm suspension). Ridden on its debut by Nino Grieco on 1st October 1946, the Parilla could claim to be Italy's first new racing motorcycle since the War's end.

These were mainstays in Italian club racing as well as the town-to-town Moto Giro competitions. For safety reasons, these races on public roads were often limited to 175cc machinery and all interested Italian manufacturers produced bikes of this displacement.

It has the lean and hungry look of racing motorcycles of its era, lacking any compromises like a headlight, muffler of kick-starter. The clip-on handlebars and rear set pegs let the rider adopt the classic racing crouch in the days before riders hung off their bikes to secure higher cornering speeds. The black and red Dual seat tone paint is a residual seat of Parrilla's Norton Manx encounter. He often used the traditional black and red shades on different Parrilla models.

The here offered Parrilla 175cc MSDS with is overhead camshaft from the Amsterdam Italian Motor Museum, is a one of a kind with. This bike is a stunning example of an Italian racing bike from the time when Italian machinery ruled many road racing classes. Its lines are d

Friday, March 19, 2021/Author: admin/Number of views (1173)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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DEMM 175 RACE BIKE

DEMM 175 RACE BIKE

DEMM 175 RACE BIKE

1957 DEMM 175 PRODUCTION RACER

Engine no.: -/-
Frame no.: -/-

ALUMINIUM TANK

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 60 x 61 mm
Compression ratio: 7.0:1
Engine Capacity: 172.4cc
Maximum power: 9 bpm [HP] @ 6,500 rpm
Power-to-weight ratio: 3.25
Cylinder: Cast in special iron, cylinder head in aluminum, fitted with withdrawable valve seats and guides
Valve: OHV (Single shaft operating overhead valves which are set off the vertical. Valve operating through two pairs of ‘Gleason’ helical cut bever gears
Valves per cylinder: 2
Ignition type: Automatic advance dynamo coil - 45 Watt, 6 Volt
Carburettor: Dell O’rto
Cooling system: Air cooled
Sparks per cylinder: 1 (Auto-Lite)
Lubrication: Forced lubrication of crankshaft and rocker system from a mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Primary transmission through helical cut shaved gearing, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disc in oil bath
Gearbox: 4-Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Open cradle tubular and pressed steel
Suspension: Telescopic front fork with hydraulic damping
Rear Suspension: Dual Hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum, hand operated
Rear Brake: Drum, pedal operated
Front tire: 2.75 x 19 Inches
Rear tire: 2.75 x 19 Inches
Seat: Duck tail race seat
Fuel tank capacity: ca. 19 Liter (5.0 gallons)

Daldi e Luigi Matteucci established a small company in 1919 in Milan named Società Anonima Daldi, which built automotive parts. In 1928, the company name changed to Officine Meccaniche Daldi and Matteucci and finally, in 1939, to DEMM, an acronym for Daldi and Matteucci Milan. The registered office remained in Milan, and a factory in Porretta Terme was erected which produced precision instruments and then, in 1952, building of mopeds and light motorcycles started.

In 1956, Demm established 24 world speed records in the 50cc class; this was followed by more competition success in the sixties, winning the Italian 50cc championship with their DOHC machine. While most of DEMM's proprietary engines and smaller models were two-strokes, it also built overhead-camshaft 4-strokes in capacities of up to 175cc. Demm two-stroke engines of 50, 53 and 75cc, and 4-stroke 125cc and 175cc bevel-driven OHC engines were sold to many motorcycle manufacturers. Engine production ended in 1983, but they continued selling motorcycle related products until 1988 when focus shifted entirely to gears for vehicles and machinery and were eventually absorbed by ZF.

NB: DEMM or Demm? The term DEMM is used to refer to the company itself, whereas Demm is most commonly used in Italy and elsewhere in Europe to refer to the brand, e.g., Demm Super Sport 1971.

 

Friday, March 19, 2021/Author: admin/Number of views (1019)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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CECATTO CORSA 75 FACTORY RACER

CECATTO CORSA 75 FACTORY RACER

CECATTO CORSA 75 FACTORY RACER

1954 CECCATO CORSA 75 RACER

Frame no.: -/-
Engine no.: *0154*

 

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Bore & stroke: 45 x 47 mm
Maximum power: 74.75cc
Engine Capacity: 7 bhp [HP] @ 10,500 rpm
Valve: Overhead camshaft controlled by cascade of gears, valves arranged symmetrically with included angle of 90 ° and recalled by needle springs (OHV)
Valves per cylinder: 2
Distribution: A.A.A.42° - R.C.A. 65° - A.A.S. 58° - R.C.S. 36°
Carburettor: Dell O’rto UA 18 BS3
Cooling system: Air cooled
Ignition type: Battery / coil ignition
Lubrication: Forced with oil in the finned cup and coaxial gear pump to the ignition generator
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disk
Gearbox: 4 speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Double tubular cradle frame
Suspension: Telescopic front fork with hydraulic damping
Rear Suspension: Dual Hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Light alloy drum brakes Ø 120 mm
Rear Brake: Drum
Front Tyre: 2.375 x 20 Inches
Rear Tyre: 2.375 x 20 Inches
Wheelbase: 1,200 mm
Seat: Tail-prolonged upholstered race seat
Top speed: Around 140 km/h (86.99 mph)
Weight: 70 Kg

 

Few motorcycle enthusiasts outside its native Italy are likely to have heard of Ceccato, though its stylish and well-made products are unmistakably Italian. The company was founded by Pietro Ceccato, born in 1905 in Montecchio Maggiore near Vicenza in northern Italy. He was interested in electronics and mechanics in general, motorcycling and road racing in particular. He started racing on a Moto Vicentini, a company later taken over by Gillet-Herstal. With a 350 Velocette, he attracted more attention and Rudge offered him a 500cc racer to use. That resulted in the Italian championship in 1933. In 1934, Pietro Ceccato quit the racing scene. He sold his house for cash to start production of office materials. The revenue allowed him to purchase a building area in the Alte district of Montecchio Maggiore and start a factory for quality products.

Immediately after the WW-II, he started making air compressors, car lifts and other garage equipment. During the La Construzione period, the Italians were badly in need of cheap means of transportation. Together with Hence Pietro, Pietro Ceccato decided to make motorcycles and started with the Romeo, a sporty sparkling red motorized bicycle, with a 38cc 2-stroke roller engine above the rear wheel, followed by a 48cc engine version in 1948. In 1951, a 49cc 2-stroke moped was introduced as well as a 75cc 2-stroke motorcycle. Soon after they also produced a 100, 125, and later on a 175cc version. All models were tested at Ceccato's own testing track and the first models were mostly sold to their own workers.

At the start of 1953, a 200cc horizontal 2-stroke twin was introduced. This engine looked almost identical to the Motobi Catria. Which one was first remains a question. The factory 's surface area was enlarged and the number of personnel would rise to 700. Since Pietro was such a large local employer and his personnel management was very social, the town district's name Alte was popularly called ‘Alte Ceccato’, which later became the official name.

Pietro's passion for racing saw the entry of four Ceccato's in the Milan-Taranto and Motogiro d'Italia long distance races of 1953. Two 75cc a

Monday, February 22, 2021/Author: admin/Number of views (1220)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: 3.0
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