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1956 GILERA 175 SUPER SPORT

1956 GILERA 175 SUPER SPORT

1956 GILERA 175 SUPER SPORT

1956 GILERA 175 SUPER SPORT

Engine no.: *189*4529*
Frame no.: *6262*

 

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 60 x 61 mm
Engine Capacity: 172.5cc
Maximum power: 9.1 bhp [HP]
Valve: OHV (Overhead Valves)
Valves per cylinder: 2
Carburettor: Dell O’rto
Cooling system: Air cooled
Ignition type: Dry sump system, with gear-driven pump feed incorporation filter
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Engine/gearbox by gears, gearbox/wheel by chain
Clutch: Multi-plate dry clutch, with adjustable springs and special plates
Gearbox: 4-Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Seamless steel tubing
Front Suspension: Telescopic fork and shock absorbers
Rear Suspension: Swingarm with hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum, internal expanding pattern Ø 150 mm (6 in)
Rear Brake: Drum Ø 150 mm (6 in)
Front tire: 19 x 2.50“
Rear tire: 19 x 2.50“
Seat: Duck-tail dual seat
Fuel tank capacity: 15 liter (3.5 gallons)
Fuel consumption: 1 liter per 50 km
Top speed: 115 km/h (72 mph)
Weight: 100 kg (220 lb)

 

This 1956 GILERA 175cc Super Sport is an authentic factory bike and was very advanced for its time. There are only two GILERA 175cc Super Sport registrated in the Netherlands.

Throughout the early 1950s, it was Gilera's racers that grabbed the headlines, taking six individual World Championships and five manufacturers' titles. Although racing generated valuable publicity, it was sales of road bikes that paid the bills. The majority of machines sold were lightweights based on the overhead-valve 125 single that had first appeared in prototype form in 1948.

Developed and enlarged first to 150cc and then 175cc, these simple OHV singles were top sellers throughout the 1950s and into the 1960s, although their high price outside Italy made them a relatively rare sight abroad.

 

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1961 B.M. BONVICINI BOLONGA 83 SORANO

1961 B.M. BONVICINI BOLONGA 83 SORANO

1961 B.M. BONVICINI BOLONGA 83 SORANO

1961 B.M. BONVICINI BOLONGA 83 SORANO

Frame no.: *6262*
Engine no.: -/-
(With Italian Documents)

 

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 49 x 52 mm
Compression ratio: 9.0:1
Engine Capacity: 83cc
Maximum power: 6.6 bhp [HP] @ 7,000 rpm
Carburettor: Dell O’rto
Cooling system: Air cooled
Valve: OHV (Overhead Valves)
Valves per cylinder: 2
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disc in oil bath
Gearbox: 4-Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Tubular and pressed steel
Front Suspension: Telescopic
Rear Suspension: Mono shock
Front Brake: Drum
Rear Brake: Drum
Front Tyre: 2.75 x 19 Inches
Rear Tyre: 2.75 x 19 Inches
Seat: Dual seat
Fuel tank capacity: 13 liter (3.7 gal)
Top speed: 90 km/h (56 mph)
Weight: 75 kg (165 lbs)

 

BM Bonvicini & Moto BM appear to be the same Italian marque. There were two other brands with the name BM, see BM (France) and BM (Turin). The founder of BM Bonvicini was Mario Bonvicini (born Granarolo dell'Emilia 1903 - died Bologna 1986), who was a professional and successful motorcycle racer between 1926 and 1930. In 1926, Bonvicini won the Astico-Brenta and the Tre Valli Varesine. In the following season he participated in the Giro d'Italia, finishing second in the first stage, and was tenth in the Giro del Veneto.

After WO-II, in 1950, he started with the production of light motorcycles with German JLO two-stroke built-in engines, as well as some of his own design. 4-stroke models were also introduced in the years 1952/1953. The BM Bonvicini Lusso had a 100cc NSU Fox engine and there were also 125 and 250cc models, the last of which even had an overhead camshaft. Some of the factory output was marketed in Germany under the Tornax banner.

In 1956, the range was considerably expanded with a 50cc model, a 75cc scooter, a 150cc 4-stroke with four gears and a 75cc triporteur. In the following years, 50cc, 75cc, 83cc and 125cc models were sold, included 50cc and 175cc racing machines with frames by Verlicchi. Also a moped. The ‘Jaguarino Turismo’ and the ‘Jaguarino Cross’, both produced by BM Bonvicini, with two stroke engines of 48cc. Minarelli engines were fitted to the Pokerino scooter of 1963.

In the 1970’s BM Bonvicini built various sports mopeds, scooters and minibikes, this time using Morini Franco or Minarelli 2-stroke motors, some with 6-speeds! Moto BM was a past master at choosing fantasy model names like Pokerino, Minotauro and Jaguarino! One of the firm's promotions offered just the two words, 'Ultra Bologna.' The range of models quickly declined in the 1980s. In 1988, the Company closed their doors.

Friday, March 19, 2021/Author: admin/Number of views (29)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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1957 MV AGUSTA 175

1957 MV AGUSTA 175

1957 MV AGUSTA 175

1957 MV AGUSTA 175

Frame no.: *923068*
Engine no.: *923080*

DUTCH REGISTRATION PAPERS

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 59.5 x 62 mm
Compression ratio: 6.7:1
Engine Capacity: 172cc
Maximum power: 8 bhp [HP] (6 kW) @ 5,200 rpm
Cooling system: Air cooled
Ignition: 6V-40W
Distribution: Two overhead valves controlled by a camshaft operated by a chain (OHV)
Ignition: Flywheel-magneto, 6V-40W
Carburettor: Dell'Orto 18 mm
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disk in oil bath
Gearbox: 4-Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Open cradle tubular and pressed steel
Front Suspension: Telescopic fork and shock absorbers
Rear Suspension: Swingarm with hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum Ø 180 mm
Rear Brake: Drum Ø 150 mm
Wheelbase: 1,280 mm
Front Tyre: 2.75 x 19 Inches
Rear Tyre: 2.75 x 19 Inches
Seat: Dual seat
Fuel tank capacity: 14 liters (3.69 gallons)
Fuel consumption: 3 liter per 100km
Top speed: 115 km/h (70 mph)
Weight: 114 Kg (251 lb)
Number of production: 9,500 ex.

 

One of the most famous names in Italian motorcycling history, the Meccanica Verghera concern can trace its history back to 1945 when the first two-wheeled machine to bear the MV moniker appeared. MV Agusta started with the production of the 98, this was a modest scooter designed to meet the need for cheap transportation, with the MV Company looking to diversify away from its principal base in the aeronautical industry.

MV quickly expanded the model range to include more sporting machines and established a reputation for building winning race bikes. MV officially began racing in 1946 but it was the new 4-stroke 125cc single and 500cc four-cylinder machines of 1950 that put the brand on the map, the latter giving Les Graham and John Surtees world titles. Meanwhile the range of road bikes continued to expand through the 1960s, with MV one of the few Italian manufacturers rising to meet the challenge of the Japanese through diversification.

The 4-stroke 175, launched with little fanfare in 1957, was a conventional but attractively styled machine available in Turismo, Sport and Lusso models and remained in production until 1960. Sold in both pushrod and more expensive single-cam versions, the former offering mechanical simplicity and reliability, the latter a more sporting edge. Both used an open duplex cradle frame with swing-arm rear suspension and a teledraulic fork, along with a unit construction four-speed gearbox.

 

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PARILLA 175 MSDS PRIVATEER RACER

PARILLA 175 MSDS PRIVATEER RACER

PARILLA 175 MSDS PRIVATEER RACER

1957 PARILLA 175

Frame no.: *450219*
Engine no.: *406660*

 

Engine: Single cylinder DOHC 4-stroke
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 59.8 x 62 mm
Compression ratio: 7.0:1
Engine Capacity: 175cc
Maximum power: 10 bhp [HP] / 6,500 rpm
Valve: DOHC
Valves per cylinder: 2
Carburettor: Dell O’rto
Cooling system: Air cooled
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disc in oil bath
Gearbox: 4 Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Open cradle tubular and pressed steel
Front Suspension: Telescopic fork and shock absorbers
Rear Suspension: Swingarm with hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum
Rear Brake: Drum
Seat: Duck tail race seat
Fuel tank capacity: ca. 14 liters
Weight: 100kg (220lb)
Top speed: 160 km/h (100 mph)

 

Giovanni Parrilla was a Spaniard who grew up in Italy. He was one of many new motorcycle manufacturers who sprung up after World War II. Part of his technical education came when he bought a Norton Manx and took it apart. The company's approach to styling was distinctive and they have joined other Italian small displacement bikes as favourites of the collector crowd.

Giovanni Parrilla built his first motorcycle in 1946, dropping his surname's second 'r' to call the machine 'Parilla'. Mr. Parrilla owned a shop on the outskirts of Milan specialising in the repair of diesel injector pumps. He also held an agency for Bosch sparking plugs.

The first Parilla motorcycle - a 250cc overhead-camshaft single-cylinder racer - was the work of Ing. Giuseppe Salmaggi, who already had the Gilera Saturno to his credit. Giovanni Parrilla was a big Norton fan so the 250 racer's engine employed a bevel-driven overhead-camshaft just like the British manufacturer's Manx. There the similarity ended however, for the Parilla was a thoroughly modern design boasting unitary construction of the engine/transmission and geared primary drive. The new power unit went into a welded loop-type chassis featuring a single down-tube, girder front fork and plunger rear suspension. (Later versions had a telescopic fork and swinging-arm suspension). Ridden on its debut by Nino Grieco on 1st October 1946, the Parilla could claim to be Italy's first new racing motorcycle since the War's end.

These were mainstays in Italian club racing as well as the town-to-town Moto Giro competitions. For safety reasons, these races on public roads were often limited to 175cc machinery and all interested Italian manufacturers produced bikes of this displacement.

It has the lean and hungry look of racing motorcycles of its era, lacking any compromises like a headlight, muffler of kick-starter. The clip-on handlebars and rear set pegs let the rider adopt the classic racing crouch in the days before riders hung off their bikes to secure higher cornering speeds. The black and red Dual seat tone paint is a residual seat of Parrilla's Norton Manx encounter. He often used the traditional black and red shades on different Parrilla models.

The here offered Parrilla 175cc MSDS with is overhead camshaft from the Amsterdam Italian Motor Museum, is a one of a kind with. This bike is a stunning example of an Italian racing bike from the time when Italian machinery ruled many road racing classes. Its lines are d

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1956 GILERA 250 “GIRO D’ITALIA”

1956 GILERA 250 “GIRO D’ITALIA”

1956 GILERA 250 “GIRO D’ITALIA”

1956 GILERA 250 “GIRO D’ITALIA”

Frame no.: *15917276*
Engine no.: **25*290**

 

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Starter: Kick-starter
Valve: OHV (Overhead Valves)
Valves per cylinder: 2
Carburettor: Dell O’rto
Cooling system: Air cooled
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disc in oil bath
Gearbox: 4-Speed, foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Open cradle tubular and pressed steel
Front Suspension: Telescopic fork and shock absorbers
Rear Suspension: Swingarm with hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum
Rear Brake: Drum
Seat: Duck tail race seat

 

The machine presented here a very rare 1956 Gilera 250cc from an Italian Motor Museum, with aluminum cylinder was specially built for the Giro D’Italia Milano, by engineering students from the University of Milan. Only 5 or 6 of these machines built by these students exist worldwide. It comes with his official lead seal of the “Giro d’Italia” and his official racing number “52”. This Gilera 250cc Street Racer is in generally excellent condition and after the usual safety checks ready for setting forth on the street again and joining the next year “Giro d’Italia”.

The motorcycle manufacturer was founded in 1909 by Giuseppe Gilera in Arcore. In 1935, Gilera acquired rights to the Rondine four-cylinder engine. It was the world's most powerful engine with 45 kW (60 hp) at that time. The first across-the-frame 4-cylinder motorcycle was the racer 1939 Gilera 500 Rondine. It had double-over-head camshafts, forced-inducting supercharger and was water-cooled, producing 60 kW (80 hp) at 9000 and had a top speed of 140 mph (230 km/h). This formed the basis for Gilera racing machines for nearly forty years. From the mid-thirties, Gilera developed a range of 4-stroke engine machines. The engines ranged from 100 to 500 cc.

After withdrawing from competition in 1957, Gilera changed direction abruptly. They downplayed their hitherto successful line of 4-stroke singles and began to focus on motocross and off-road events in association with independent specialist Elmeca. Sales declined through the 1960s and by 1968, the company was in receivership. The company was purchased by Piaggio in 1969.

 

Friday, March 19, 2021/Author: admin/Number of views (42)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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DEMM 175 RACE BIKE

DEMM 175 RACE BIKE

DEMM 175 RACE BIKE

1957 DEMM 175 PRODUCTION RACER

Engine no.: -/-
Frame no.: -/-

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 60 x 61 mm
Compression ratio: 7.0:1
Engine Capacity: 172.4cc
Maximum power: 9 bpm [HP] @ 6,500 rpm
Power-to-weight ratio: 3.25
Cylinder: Cast in special iron, cylinder head in aluminum, fitted with withdrawable valve seats and guides
Valve: OHV (Single shaft operating overhead valves which are set off the vertical. Valve operating through two pairs of ‘Gleason’ helical cut bever gears
Valves per cylinder: 2
Ignition type: Automatic advance dynamo coil - 45 Watt, 6 Volt
Carburettor: Dell O’rto
Cooling system: Air cooled
Sparks per cylinder: 1 (Auto-Lite)
Lubrication: Forced lubrication of crankshaft and rocker system from a mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Primary transmission through helical cut shaved gearing, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disc in oil bath
Gearbox: 4-Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Open cradle tubular and pressed steel
Suspension: Telescopic front fork with hydraulic damping
Rear Suspension: Dual Hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum, hand operated
Rear Brake: Drum, pedal operated
Front tire: 2.75 x 19 Inches
Rear tire: 2.75 x 19 Inches
Seat: Duck tail race seat
Fuel tank capacity: ca. 19 Liter (5.0 gallons)

Daldi e Luigi Matteucci established a small company in 1919 in Milan named Società Anonima Daldi, which built automotive parts. In 1928, the company name changed to Officine Meccaniche Daldi and Matteucci and finally, in 1939, to DEMM, an acronym for Daldi and Matteucci Milan. The registered office remained in Milan, and a factory in Porretta Terme was erected which produced precision instruments and then, in 1952, building of mopeds and light motorcycles started.

In 1956, Demm established 24 world speed records in the 50cc class; this was followed by more competition success in the sixties, winning the Italian 50cc championship with their DOHC machine. While most of DEMM's proprietary engines and smaller models were two-strokes, it also built overhead-camshaft 4-strokes in capacities of up to 175cc. Demm two-stroke engines of 50, 53 and 75cc, and 4-stroke 125cc and 175cc bevel-driven OHC engines were sold to many motorcycle manufacturers. Engine production ended in 1983, but they continued selling motorcycle related products until 1988 when focus shifted entirely to gears for vehicles and machinery and were eventually absorbed by ZF.

NB: DEMM or Demm? The term DEMM is used to refer to the company itself, whereas Demm is most commonly used in Italy and elsewhere in Europe to refer to the brand, e.g., Demm Super Sport 1971.

 

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1956 MV AGUSTA 175 ‘CSS-5V (VELOCITÀ)

1956 MV AGUSTA 175 ‘CSS-5V (VELOCITÀ)

1956 MV AGUSTA 175 ‘CSS-5V (VELOCITÀ)

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 59.5 x 62 mm
Compression ratio: 9:1
Maximum power: 15 bhp [HP] @ 8,800 rpm
Torque / rpm: NA
Engine Capacity: 172.3cc
Distribution: Single overhead cam (OHV) with timing chain
Ignition: Flywheel-magneto, 6V-40W
Spark plug: 1
Carburettor: Dell'Orto 25.2 mm
Cooling system: Air cooled
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disk in oil bath
Gearbox: 5-Speed foot-change with chain drive
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Double cradle tubular and pressed steel
Front Suspension: Telescopic fork and shock absorbers
Rear Suspension: Swingarm with hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum Ø 180 mm
Rear Brake: Drum Ø 150 mm
Wheelbase: 1,280 mm
Front Tyre: 2.75 x 21”
Rear Tyre: 2.75 x 21”
Seat: Feathered cantilever saddle
Fuel tank capacity: 20 liter3(5.28 gallon)
Top speed: 135 km/h (84 mph)
Weight: 95 Kg (209.4 lb)
Number of production: only 6 built
Note: So far known only complete preserved original example

 

This 1956 MV AGUSTA 175 ‘CSS-5V Regolarità Monoalbero’, here offered is arguably a very rare motorcycle. MV AGUSTA produced the 175 ‘CSS-5V Regolarità Monoalbero’ between 1954 and 1956.

Initially fitted with the 175 ‘CSS’ engine, they replaced it in 1955 with the model ‘175 CSS-5V’. The frame is the series “CSS” with a modified closed cradle, telescopic front fork and raised exhaust system. MV AGUSTA produced these ‘175 CSS-5V Regolarità Monoalbero’ exclusively for the official MV Regolarità team. It definitely belongs to the most attractive MV machines ever built.

Between 1954 and 1956, MV AGUSTA achieved 17 wins in total with the ‘175 CSS-5V Regolarità Monoalbero’. MV pilot M. Fornasari won a Gold Medal on his ‘175 CSS-5V’ during the International Six Days Trial (ISDT), and in general, the MV Agusta Team collected 7 victories.

The MV AGUSTA 175 ‘CSS-5V Regolarità Monoalbero’ were never available on the open market. Between 1954 and 1956, only SIX (..!!!) machines were built, exclusively for the MV Regolarità (‘Regolaristi’) team. As far as we know, only two have survived. The finest one is this one, which is in a beautiful condition and almost original. That makes this MV AGUSTA 175 ‘CSS-5V Regolarità Monoalbero’ a real treasure, a true gem that is missing in any serious MV Agusta collection around the world.

Only in exceptional cases, a copy was occasionally sold between private collectors in the past and as far we know, this is the first time an MV AGUSTA 175 "CSS-5V Regolarità Monoalbero" will be sold . A unique opportunity to become the owner of one of the rarest and most unreachable Enduro machines.

Sunday, February 28, 2021/Author: admin/Number of views (167)/Comments (0)/ Article rating: No rating
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MOTO RUMI 250 FOUR IN LINE

MOTO RUMI 250 FOUR IN LINE

MOTO RUMI 250 FOUR IN LINE

MOTO RUMI 250 ‘FOUR IN LINE’ 

Inline: Four cylinders ‘in Line’ 2-stroke
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke:
Compression ratio: 10.5:1
Valves per cylinder: 2
Engine mounting:
Engine Capacity: 249.36 cc
Maximum power: 18 bhp [HP]
Power-to-weight ratio:
Carburettor: Four Dell O’rto 18 mm Carburettors
Cooling system: Air cooled
Sparks per cylinder: 1
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disc
Gearbox: 4-Speed gearbox, foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Tubular and pressed steel
Front Suspension: Tubular swinging arm rear suspension and teleforks
Rear Suspension: Mono shock, Swingarm
Front Brake: Drum
Rear Brake: Drum
Front tire: 2.25 x 18 Inches
Rear tire: 2.25 x 18 Inches
Seat: Duck tail race seat
Fuel tank capacity: ca. 20 liter (5.28 gallons)
 

This very rare 250 ‘Four In Line’ Racing Rumi is a jewel of Italian craftsmanship and Motorcycle performance. The ‘Four In Line’ Racing Rumi 250 is one of only three in existence and was constructed by Giuseppe Fabbri in 1960. Giuseppe Fabbri was a former Gilera agent in Lugo di Ravenna, Italy.

The ‘Four In Line’ Racing Rumi 250 consists two 125 Moto Rumi two-stroke twin engines with horizontal cylinders. Giuseppe Fabbri constructed only 10 ‘Fabbri’ engines: two 3-cylinder horizontal; three 4-cylinder horizontal (including the here presented Racing Rumi 250 of The Amsterdam Italian Motor Museum); two x 4-cylinder V-shape; one 6-cylinder horizontal; one 8-cylinder V-shape. The sound of these machines was surely breathtaking!

The Moto Rumi company was founded in 1914 by Donnino Rumi. ‘Officine Fonderie Rumi’ as they called the company at that time, supplied cast components to the textile machinery industry. At the outbreak of World War II, Rumi became involved in the manufacture of armaments, miniature submarines and torpedoes. The anchor in the Moto Rumi logo reminds us of this period. After the war, Rumi undertook general engineering work and like many Italian companies, chose motorcycles as its next target.

By 1949, the firm unveiled an exquisitely designed laid-down two-stroke twin-cylinder motor of 125cc with a 180-degree crankshaft and shapely unit-construction crankcase. The original Rumis used cast-iron cylinder barrels, and their chassis featured plunger rear suspension with undamped telescopic forks up front, full-width aluminum brake hubs and the motor slung under the frame tubes and held at two points. In 1950, Rumi decided to get involved in the manufacture of lightweight motorcycles. It was also decided to base the powerplant on the horizontal twin two-stroke unit of 125cc capacity. Rumi started manufacturing the Squirrel or Scoiottolo - a pressed steel monocoque body with tubular swinging arm rear suspension and tele forks with 14-inch wheels and three gears.

From 1952, Rumi built a SuperSport version of its twin for road racing with two carburetors, which was superseded by the Gobbetto racer and the Junior Corsa that had a full swingarm frame and serious tuning for its 175cc engine, which was good for 100 mph.

The company participated in a wide range of competitions immediately, including the ISDT (where it won the Team Prize in 1954 with three golds), long-distance races (winning the&

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GILERA 150 REGOLARITÀ SUPER SPORT

GILERA 150 REGOLARITÀ SUPER SPORT

GILERA 150 REGOLARITÀ SUPER SPORT

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 60 x 61 mm
Compression ratio: 10:1
Engine Capacity: 175cc
Maximum power: 11.5 bhp [HP] @ 8,500 rpm
Valve: OHV (Overhead Valves)
Valves per cylinder: 2
Carburettor: Dell O’rto UB 24 BS
Cooling system: Air cooled
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump, cup capacity 1.6 liters
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disk in oil bath
Gearbox: 5-Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Double cradle open in steel tubes, sleeve inclination 27 °
Front Suspension: Telescopic fork and shock absorbers
Rear Suspension: Swingarm with hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum
Rear Brake: Drum
Front Tyre: 2.75 x 21 Inches
Rear Tyre: 2.25 x 21 Inches
Seat: Dual seat
Fuel tank capacity: 10 Liter
Fuel consumption: 3.5 liter per 100 km.
Top speed: 100 Km/h (62 mph)

 

Throughout the early 1950s it was Gilera's road-racers that grabbed the headlines as they had in pre-war days, winning the 500cc World Championship on no fewer than six occasions between 1950 and 1957. But although racing generated valuable publicity, it was sales of road bikes that paid the bills. The majority of machines sold were lightweights based on the overhead-valve 125cc single that had appeared in prototype form in 1948. Developed and enlarged first to 150cc and then 175cc and beyond, these simple OHV singles proved top sellers throughout the 1950s and 1960s.

Following its withdrawal from Grand Prix road racing, Gilera turned increasingly to off-road competition, principally the International Six Days Trial, as a means of keeping its name in the public eye.

Before then though, the Arcore firm had relied on developments of its traditional single-cylinder 4-stroke roadsters, such as the 150cc five-speed model offered here. Regolarità (Regularity) 'Six Days' enduro models were offered in 98cc, 125cc and 175cc capacities, all equipped with the necessities of off-road competition: 21" front wheel, 'knobbly' tyres, upswept exhaust, wide 'bars and generous ground clearance.

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CECATTO CORSA 75 FACTORY RACER

CECATTO CORSA 75 FACTORY RACER

CECATTO CORSA 75 FACTORY RACER

1954 CECCATO CORSA 75 RACER

Frame no.: -/-
Engine no.: *0154*

 

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Bore & stroke: 45 x 47 mm
Maximum power: 74.75cc
Engine Capacity: 7 bhp [HP] @ 10,500 rpm
Valve: Overhead camshaft controlled by cascade of gears, valves arranged symmetrically with included angle of 90 ° and recalled by needle springs (OHV)
Valves per cylinder: 2
Distribution: A.A.A.42° - R.C.A. 65° - A.A.S. 58° - R.C.S. 36°
Carburettor: Dell O’rto UA 18 BS3
Cooling system: Air cooled
Ignition type: Battery / coil ignition
Lubrication: Forced with oil in the finned cup and coaxial gear pump to the ignition generator
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disk
Gearbox: 4 speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Double tubular cradle frame
Suspension: Telescopic front fork with hydraulic damping
Rear Suspension: Dual Hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Light alloy drum brakes Ø 120 mm
Rear Brake: Drum
Front Tyre: 2.375 x 20 Inches
Rear Tyre: 2.375 x 20 Inches
Wheelbase: 1,200 mm
Seat: Tail-prolonged upholstered race seat
Top speed: Around 140 km/h (86.99 mph)
Weight: 70 Kg

 

Few motorcycle enthusiasts outside its native Italy are likely to have heard of Ceccato, though its stylish and well-made products are unmistakably Italian. The company was founded by Pietro Ceccato, born in 1905 in Montecchio Maggiore near Vicenza in northern Italy. He was interested in electronics and mechanics in general, motorcycling and road racing in particular. He started racing on a Moto Vicentini, a company later taken over by Gillet-Herstal. With a 350 Velocette, he attracted more attention and Rudge offered him a 500cc racer to use. That resulted in the Italian championship in 1933. In 1934, Pietro Ceccato quit the racing scene. He sold his house for cash to start production of office materials. The revenue allowed him to purchase a building area in the Alte district of Montecchio Maggiore and start a factory for quality products.

Immediately after the WW-II, he started making air compressors, car lifts and other garage equipment. During the La Construzione period, the Italians were badly in need of cheap means of transportation. Together with Hence Pietro, Pietro Ceccato decided to make motorcycles and started with the Romeo, a sporty sparkling red motorized bicycle, with a 38cc 2-stroke roller engine above the rear wheel, followed by a 48cc engine version in 1948. In 1951, a 49cc 2-stroke moped was introduced as well as a 75cc 2-stroke motorcycle. Soon after they also produced a 100, 125, and later on a 175cc version. All models were tested at Ceccato's own testing track and the first models were mostly sold to their own workers.

At the start of 1953, a 200cc horizontal 2-stroke twin was introduced. This engine looked almost identical to the Motobi Catria. Which one was first remains a question. The factory 's surface area was enlarged and the number of personnel would rise to 700. Since Pietro was such a large local employer and his personnel management was very social, the town district's name Alte was popularly called ‘Alte Ceccato’, which later became the official name.

Pietro's passion for racing saw the entry of four Ceccato's in the Milan-Taranto and Motogiro d'Italia long distance races of 1953. Two 75cc a

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GILERA 175 PRIVATEER RACER

GILERA 175 PRIVATEER RACER

GILERA 175 PRIVATEER RACER

1957 GILERA 175 ROSSA EXTRA 4-T

Frame no.: *189*7155*
Engine no.: *189*7155*

 

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Bore & stroke:
Compression ratio:
Engine Capacity: 175cc
Maximum power:
Valve: OHV (Overhead Valves)
Valves per cylinder: 2
Carburettor: Dell O’rto 22.5mm
Cooling system: Air cooled
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disc in oil bath
Gearbox: 4-Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Single cradle tubular frame
Front Suspension: Telescopic fork and shock absorbers
Rear Suspension: Swingarm with hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum
Rear Brake: Drum
Seat: Duck tail race seat
Fuel tank capacity: ca. 20 liter

 

In the early 1950s, Gilera's racers that grabbed the headlines, taking six individual World Championships and five manufacturers' titles. Although, racing generated valuable publicity, it was the sales of road bikes that paid the bills. The majority of machines sold were lightweights based on the overhead-valve 125 single that had first appeared in prototype form in 1948. Developed and enlarged first to 150cc and then 175cc, these simple OHV singles were top sellers throughout the 1950s and into the 1960s, although their high price outside Italy made them a relatively rare sight abroad.

A matching-numbers example, this Gilera 175cc Racing Motorcycle was built for Italian street racing. Boasting a very expensive repaint, the machine is fully restored to full racing specification, the engine being rebuilt with a piston and works race-kit cams. Other noteworthy features include sand-cast engine cases, Dell’Orto 22.5mm carburetor and one-piece exhaust. Ideal for classic parading, the machine is presented in generally good condition.

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GILERA 150 SUPER SPORT

GILERA 150 SUPER SPORT

GILERA 150 SUPER SPORT

1957 GILERA 150 SUPER SPORT

Frame no.: -/-
Engine no.: *188-4087*

 

Engine: Single cylinder 4-stroke OHV
Starter: Kick-starter
Bore & stroke: 60 x 54 mm
Engine Capacity: 152cc cast iron cylinder
Maximum power: 7.3 bhp [HP] (6 kW) @ 5.800 rpm
Power-to-weight ratio:
Valve: OHV (Overhead Valves)
Valves per cylinder: 2
Carburettor: Dell O’rto MA 18 B Ø 18 mm
Cooling system: Air cooled
Ignition: Battery-fed with automatically-advanced distributor
Sparks per cylinder: 1
Lubrication: Wet sump forced circulation with mechanical gear pump
Transmission: Gear primary, chain final
Clutch: Cable operated with multiple wet disk in oil bath
Gearbox: 4-Speed foot-change
Throttle: Cable operated
Frame type: Drawn steel tubes
Front Suspension: Telescopic fork and shock absorbers
Rear Suspension: Swingarm with hydraulic shock absorbers
Front Brake: Drum, Ø 150 mm (6 in)
Rear Brake: Drum, Ø 150 mm
Front tire: 19 x 2.50“
Rear tire: 19 x 2.50“
Seat: Dual seat
Fuel tank capacity: 13 Liter
Fuel consumption: 2.5 liter per 100 Km
Top speed: 100 km/h (62 mph)
Weight: 100 kg (220 lb)
List price at that time: £ 193.73.

 

After the Second World War, there was a great diffusion of the two motorized wheels, which helped to solve the mobility problems of the population. In this quick growing market, Gilera had preferred to introduce the ‘Neptune’ and ‘Saturn’ in mid- 1946. However, Gilera soon realized that these bikes were not the most suitable to deal with the market, and he decided to appoint engineer Piero Remor of the study of an economic model, but with a 4-stroke engine.

The new law in Italy, which imposed the ‘125’ marking and allowed access to motorways for motorcycles with a minimum capacity of 150cc, decreased the production output of the ‘125’ and its replacement with the ‘150’, after a total of 25,000 specimens were built in the various series and versions. For the sake of completeness, it should be added that in 1955, Gilera marketed a ‘125’ derived from the ‘150’ and named ‘Export’ as it was intended for export, in particular in the Swiss Confederation, keeping it in the catalog up to 1959.

Presented in 1952 as the heir of 125, the 150th will be Gilera's best-selling ever, with 96,000 specimens (excluding those built in Argentina by the local branch). Two versions available initially: Tourism and Sport, which were distinct mainly for the front suspension (parallelogram Tourism, Telescopic Sport). For both gears, it remained at 3 ratios. Already in 1953, Sport won a 4th gear.

In the following years, Gilera presented the Gran Turismo (1955), the Super Sport and Red Super (1957). The production ceased in 1960.

 

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